ORBÁN, HUNGARY AND THE BATTLE OF IDEAS

23 March 2016

As the dust and debris settles after the latest terror outrage in Brussels, it is inevitable that a sustained period of soul-searching will break out in Europe.  Why has it come to this?  Why should Europe suffer such carnage?  There is no doubt that these are dark days for Europe.

EU IMMIGRATION QUOTAS: THE IMPACT ON HUNGARY

11 May 2015

In the coming days, the European Commission is preparing to table a proposal that will see a shake-up of the Union’s immigration rules and lead to a requirement that refugees reaching Europe should be spread more equally amongst Member States and not – as the current rules state – in the country in which they first arrive in the Union.

RECONCILIATION, TRUTH AND JUSTICE IN HUNGARY: ORBÁN SHOULD SEIZE THE MOMENT

12 March 2015

This week, Lajos Simicska, a former friend and political ally of the Hungarian Prime Minister, gave an interview on mandiner.hu  in which he raised his suspicion that Viktor Orbán might have been recruited as an informer of the old regime. This recruitment, suggested Simicska, most likely took place when Orbán and many of his Fidesz colleagues were conscripts in the early 1980s. The inference was that this was having a detrimental effect on the country.

THE FINANCIAL TIMES AND HUNGARY’S ELECTION: A BITTER PILL TO SWALLOW

11 April 2014

The reaction of the Financial Times to Viktor Orbán’s decisive victory in last week’s Hungarian election was something to behold. An editorial steeped in invective set the tone; a leading commentator produced a hatchet job on the victors (no pun intended) and the FT’s resident journalist in Budapest found that the OSCE monitors had sullied the election victory with an observation that the rules gave an advantage to the incumbent.

Now the question I frequently ask myself is why?  What is it about Hungary that so enrages the paragons of virtue at the Financial Times?

HUNGARY AND ITS CRITICS: ORWELLIAN DEMOCRACY AT ITS BEST

10 April 2013

For the past two years, Hungary’s government, prime minister and governing party have been the subject of largely unprecedented attacks by both internal and external critics. These critics have assailed everything from the size of their parliamentary majority, their drafting of a new constitution, freedom of the press and the judiciary and their ‘unorthodox’ economic policy.